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Book Jacket

Trade Paperback
240 pages
Mar 2005
Crossway Books

Beyond the Shadowlands: C. S. Lewis on Heaven and Hell

by Wayne Martindale

Review  |   Author Bio  |  Read an Excerpt

Review:

If, like me, the mere mention of C. S. Lewis causes you to abandon all other subjects, you will relish Beyond the Shadowlands. Professor of English at Wheaton College, aficionado of C. S. Lewis, author and editor of Lewisian tomes, Wayne Martindale uses Lewis’ own truth-based myths, and tightly reasoned arguments to cast biblical light on the actualities of Heaven and Hell, demythologizing modern myths such as heavenly harps and crowns, and hell is only a state of mind. The meaning that Lewis imparted to such words as ‘mythology’ and ‘joy’ is amply discussed. Martindale closes with a brief study of Lewis’ treatment of Purgatory. Generous footnotes, collated at the back of the book, add interesting information. A lengthy bibliography encourages further reading. The index will help readers find those statements they just have to read again.

For those not yet acquainted with C. S. Lewis, Beyond the Shadowlands warmly introduces this beloved and challenging author. Old friends will have fun learning, re-learning, agreeing, arguing, and complaining because Martindale didn’t include just that particular passage they’ve always felt was the most important. Readers will want to have their piles of Lewis’ books on hand to refer to again and again. Both old and new friends will have their intellect, curiosity, and intelligence challenged.

With the threat of a Disney-enhanced Narnia hanging over us, Beyond the Shadowlands will refresh our memories and draw us closer to the basic C. S. Lewis. – Donna Eggett, Christian Book Previews.com

Book Jacket:

C. S. Lewis’s fiction is rich with reflections on the afterlife. For many, reading his books helps in forming a more vivid understanding of Heaven and Hell. In this book, Lewis scholar Wayne Martindale uses some of Lewis’s best-loved fiction as an imaginative complement to his discussion on eternity.

Those who know Lewis’s work will enjoy Martindale’s thorough examination of the powerful images of Heaven and Hell found in Lewis’s fiction, and all readers can appreciate Martindale’s scholarly yet accessible tone. Read this book, and you will see afresh the wonder of what lies beyond the Shadowlands.