Christian Book Previews Home
Christian Book Previews
Book Jacket

Trade Paperback
304 pages
Aug 2007
Bethany House Publishers

Jacob's List

by Stephanie Grace Whitson

Review  |   Author Bio  |  Read an Excerpt

Review:

Jacob Nolan always lived on the extreme side of life, as depicted in Stephanie Grace Whitson’s latest novel Jacob’s List.  In fact, Jacob actually made a list of all the extreme stunts he wanted to accomplish in his lifetime. Like many another egotistical person, Jacob was a god unto himself, attempting to rule and control his own life.  So it was that, sadly and ironically, Jacob did not lose his life during a death-defying act, but rather by being hit by a high-speed semi-truck.    Jacob’s parents, struggling with their Christian ethics, are faced with the challenge of trying to forgive the driver who killed their son, while simultaneously attempting to hold together their shattered lives and strained relationship. Along with their friends, the Novices, the Nolans search for hope and forgiveness. Together they try to make Jacob’s legacy list become a reality, but this time as God-honoring, not God-defying.   

Whitson’s novel is a compelling story of redemption, grace, forgiveness, heartache, and spiritual growth.  It is real-to-life in showing the devastation of losing a loved one.  As a warning, in the author’s attempt at stark realism, there is a somewhat graphic love scene between a husband and wife, as well as content that deals with extra-martial affairs.  Consequently, this book is not for young readers.   

Jacob’s List is a book that makes Christians exam their lives.  Each person must study the reactions and behavior of the Nolans and ask, “Would I behave similarly under these same circumstances?”  Although targeted primarily to adult females, this book would be enlightening and challenging for all adults and particularly for parents. – Khrista Beckmann, Christian Book Previews.com

Book Jacket:

Jacob Nolan is a bright, talented college student with a bold list of things he hopes to accomplish before he "settles down." Although he is unaware of any family problems, he is possibly the only reason his parents are still together.

And then the Nolans face the most difficult challenge of their lives. They come to the realization that Jacob's list is about a lot more than youthful adventure. Will their son's list help them find each other again?